Google Fiber Speed Tests – Round Two

ASUS RT-AC66RWe’re back with round two of our Google Fiber speed tests.  This time, we’ve got a few new pieces of information, as well as some new hardware to put to the test.

In our previous tests, we were hitting a special link provided by Google to perform speed tests.  After some Q&A with a Google rep via their online Google Groups forum, we discovered that the server on the other end of these tests is located here in Kansas City.  So it makes sense that we see some insane speed test results.  However, we also discovered in our research that there is another Google Fiber speed test link which points to a server somewhere in California (we presume Mountain View).  Our speed tests with that server revealed some interesting results.

Kansas City Google Fiber Speed Test: http://speedtest.googlefiber.net
California Google Fiber Speed Test: http://speed.googlefiber.net

Another interesting note.  While we’ve been testing using many network connections, including the newest Wireless AC signal, we uncovered that there is already an 802.11ad standard.  Dubbed “WiGig”, this claims to deliver a theoretical maximum throughput of up to 7Gbit/s over the currently unused 60Ghz frequency.  That’s about as fast as an 8 antenna Wireless AC transmission.

For more on the Wireless Gigabit Alliance, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ad.

The Videos

Visit our KCStartupVillage YouTube Channel for all of our videos, including the videos from these speed tests.

The Setup

The hardware we used to perform our tests included:

  • HP Pavilion dv7 laptop
    • Intel(R) Centrino(R) Wireless-N 1030
    • Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller
  • Google Network Box
  • ASUS RT-AC66R (equivalent to the ASUS RT-AC66U)
  • Netgear A6200

The Hardware

Google Network Box

Again, we’re using the Google Network Box for these tests.  Check out our Round One speed test results for more info on the Google Network Box.

ASUS RT-AC66R Router

The ASUS RT-AC66R is a nicely designed router.  It comes packed with features, a nice web interface and CD to configure the router.  One of the things we like most about this router is it’s external antenna design.  This allows for the option of attaching higher gain antennas to boost the signal greater distances.

Netgear A6200 USB Adapter

Netgear A6200Again, we’re using the Netgear A6200 USB Network Adapter for these tests.  Check out our Round One speed test results for more info on this piece of equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tests

Each test consisted of a router (Google Network Box or ASUS RT-AC66R), adapter (Ethernet or Wireless), protocol (Gigabit Ethernet, Wireless N or Wireless AC) and in the case of wireless connections, signal frequency (2.4Ghz or 5Ghz).

Test #1

Google Network Box + Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

Google Fiber Speed Test - Google Network Box - Gigabit Ethernet - Kansas City  Google Fiber Speed Test - Google Network Box - Gigabit Ethernet - California

Test #2

ASUS RT-AC66R + Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller

Note – We later discovered the speeds were so low because we were connected via ethernet at 100Mbps rather than 1000Mbps.  It seems to have been a poor connection.  After we fixed the issue, we were getting some speeds similar to being ethernet connected to the Google Network Box.

Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Gigabit Ethernet - Kansas City  Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Gigabit Ethernet - California

Test #3

ASUS RT-AC66R + Intel(R) Centrino(R) Wireless-N 1030 + Wireless N + 2.4Ghz

Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Internal - Wireless N - 2.4Ghz - Kansas City  Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Internal - Wireless N - 2.4Ghz - California

Test #3

ASUS RT-AC66R + Netgear A6200 + Wireless N + 2.4Ghz

Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Netgear A6200 - Wireless N - 2.4Ghz - Kansas City  Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Netgear A6200 - Wireless N - 2.4Ghz - California

Test #4

ASUS RT-AC66R + Netgear A6200 + Wireless AC + 5Ghz

Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Netgear A6200 - Wireless AC - 5Ghz - Kansas City  Google Fiber Speed Test - ASUS RT-AC66R - Netgear A6200 - Wireless AC - 5Ghz - California

The Conclusion

Once again we see that being hardlined to the router via Ethernet is the way to go.  That is where you find the most impressive speeds.  After that is the Wireless AC signal which churns out speeds about twice as fast as Wireless N speeds.

It’s safe to say that Local Ruckus, FormZapper and Leap2 are going to enjoy the service no matter what connection they use.  After all, all of the results in our speed tests crush typical ISP speeds in America (for now, anyway).

Share on Facebook2Tweet about this on Twitter1Share on LinkedIn1Share on Google+6Share on Reddit5Share on StumbleUpon0Pin on Pinterest0Flattr the authorShare on TumblrDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Google Fiber
  • http://www.facebook.com/NegativeGuy Matt Dawdy

    I was told there would be no math. So, no wireless can deliver 1 Gb speed? Son, I am disappoint.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000817876800 Jack Daley

      Currently the only connections that can reach 1gbps or higher are:
      Hyper fiber cables between countries lined at the bottom of oceans (clocking at between 10gbps and 100gbps depending on when they were layed) and Li-Fi which is a connection from a lightbulb connected to the hardline that then transmits a binary signal in the light that transfers data. Theoretically, with Li-Fi you can have 10gbps speed for the cost of the average copper cable connection deal. It is possible that in the next few years FTTP (fibre to the premises) will be able to produce similar speeds but in the majority of countries that is still at least 4 years away for mass connections.

  • http://www.facebook.com/james.christian.nelson James Nelson

    Speedtests within Google’s network is of little value unless you are only communication with servers and/or consumers on that same network. What are the tests like to other networks? Many can be reached from speedtest.net.

    Another crucial bit of data are the ping rates which tell if there is significant lag in the network. Do you have any test data showing those outside google’s network?

Featured Press

CNN - Anderson Cooper 360    Associated Press

Wall Street Journal

VentureBeat

Fast Company

The Washington Post

Mashable   Inc.

Ars Technica    GigaOM    Tech Cocktail    Silicon Prairie News

More KCSV Press

Shop & Donate



Shop the KCSV

Donate to the KCSV

@KCSV on Twitter

Tags

SquareOffs